OCCMED - RESOURCES

  

Occupational Medicine at MCCH

MCCH Occupational Medicine Resources

OccMed at MCCH works to ensure that we are able to provide customized care to clients and employees. It is crucial that we stay up-to-date on changes that are implemented via OSHA and other regulating agencies. In order to do this, we utilize many healthcare and wellness resources that are available to you for your occupational medicine inquiries.

OSHA
With the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)* to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.

OSHA is part of the United States Department of Labor. The administrator for OSHA is the Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health. OSHA's administrator answers to the Secretary of Labor, who is a member of the cabinet of the President of the United States. 
 
NIOSH
The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 established NIOSH. NIOSH is part of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It has the mandate to assure “every man and woman in the Nation safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve our human resources.” NIOSH has more than 1,300 employees from a diverse set of fields including epidemiology, medicine, nursing, industrial hygiene, safety, psychology, chemistry, statistics, economics, and many branches of engineering. NIOSH works closely with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Mine Safety and Health Administration in the U.S. Department of Labor to protect American workers and miners. 
 
DOT - FMCSA
The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000, pursuant to the Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999 (49 U.S.C. 113). Formerly a part of the Federal Highway Administration, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries. Activities of the Administration contribute to ensuring safety in motor carrier operations through strong enforcement of safety regulations; targeting high-risk carriers and commercial motor vehicle drivers; improving safety information systems and commercial motor vehicle technologies; strengthening commercial motor vehicle equipment and operating standards; and increasing safety awareness. To accomplish these activities, the Administration works with Federal, State, and local enforcement agencies, the motor carrier industry, labor and safety interest groups, and others.  
 
DOT - FMCSA Drug and Alcohol Program
The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), along with the Department of Transportation (DOT), requires that persons subject to the commercial driver’s license (CDL) requirements and their employers follow alcohol and drug testing rules. These rules include procedures for testing, frequency of tests, and substances tested for. 
 
DOT - FMCSA National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners
Where can a driver find a medical examiner who complies with Federal regulations? How do Motor Carriers rest assured that their drivers are truly physically qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle? The National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners exists to answer those questions and allay concerns.

A database of certified medical examiners is a core element of the National Registry. Medical Examiners have to take a training course and pass a certification exam to be listed on the National Registry. The list of certified medical examiners including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and chiropractors, is available on the National Registry website (https://nationalregistry.fmcsa.dot.gov).