Murray Calloway County Hospital

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Patient Information

Angiogram/Arteriogram: An Angiogram is a special x-ray test to study blood vessels (arteries or veins) and blood flow by using a special solution which shows up on the x-rays. The angiogram is the best way to "see" your blood vessels. The doctor will then use that information to decide how best to help you. Angiograms are not a surgical procedure. The radiologist and technologist or nurse will explain what is happening to you. You will be able to ask questions at any time. The examination will take 1 to 2 hours.

Arthrogram: An Arthrogram exam evaluates the internal part of you joint (called soft tissue). Many conditions such as arthritis, injuries, or infections can damage these parts. There is not special preparation for the test. The test takes about 1 hour. You will be asked to lie on a flat table. The radiologist will inject a medicine to numb you joint area. A second injection of clear liquid and/or air will be given to help show the soft tissue of the joint. Several x-rays will then be taken. After the x-rays are reviewed by the radiologist, you may leave the department.

Barium Enema: For this exam, an x-ray will be taken to see if your bowel is clean to do a proper exam. If so, you will be given a barium enema. The barium is given followed by air to visualize the surface of the colon. You will be asked to roll from side to side on the x-ray table in order to better see the folds in the bowel. The exam itself will take about 30 minutes. You will remain in the x-ray room until the radiologist checks all of the films. The technologist will then help you to the bathroom to expel the barium.

Bone Density Analysis of the Lumbar Spine and Hip: For this procedure you will be asked to lie on a table while a scanner passes over your body. A scan of you lumbar spine and of your hip will be made. The scanner will not touch you or hurt you. There are no injections or medications. You will remain clothed throughout the procedure. For your convenience, we request that you wear or bring pants, such as jogging or sweat pants, which have no metal clasp or zipper. The procedure takes approximately 30 minutes.

CT Scan: CT Scanning is a way to look inside of your body with a special type of x-ray which shows more detail than most other x-rays. Certain examinations require an injection of contrast ("x-ray dye") which helps the physician when interpreting the scan. This is based on the type of study performed. Once you are in the exam room, a routine scan of the head may take 15 minutes. A routine scan of the body may take 30 to 45 minutes.
Cystogram: During the Cystogram exam, your bladder will be visualized through a catheter. A radio-opaque dye (x-ray contrast) is injected through the catheter to outline the bladder. Several films will be taken while the catheter is in place. The exam will take about 45 minutes. You will remain in the x-ray room until the radiologist checks all the films taken. At the end of the exam, your bladder will be drained.

Enalapril Renogram: The Enalapril Renogram is done to evaluate renal artery disease. Plan on being in our department for about 2 to 2 1/2 hours. When you arrive, the technologist will start an intravenous normal saline infusion (IV) into the vein of your arm. You will be asked to lie on a table for about 1 hour while we take images of your kidneys. It is important that you hold still or the images will be blurred. We will give you one injection in order to look at our kidney function. When this part is done, you will be asked to sit in another room for one hour while we monitor your blood pressure.

Esophagram: During this exam, which will take about 45 minutes, you will be given a white thick liquid and also some gas releasing crystals to drink. The radiologist will take several films with you in different positions. You will remain in the x-ray room until the radiologist checks all the films taken.

Heart Catheterization: A Heart Catheterization is done to determine heart function, blockages in the coronary arteries which feed the heart and to measure pressures within the heart.  A small tube is passed, by way of the  your femoral artery, up the aorta, and into the aortic arch vessel.  This tube is called a catheter.  A radio-opaque dye is then injected through the catheter which sits in the left ventricle or at the mouth of the left or right coronary artery.  The "dye" makes it possible to visualize the blood flow through the heart.  The Cardiologist, Technologists or Nurses will be able to talk to you during the procedure.  This procedure is not a surgical procedure.  It is a diagnostic procedure to see if surgery is needed.  It takes 1-2 hours and can be done on an outpatient basis.  You will be asked to stay off of your feet for at least 4 hours; (though  it might be longer). 

Intravenous Pyelogram (IVP): The IVP or Intravenous Pyelogram is an exam that shows your kidneys, ureters and bladder. The exam will take about 1 hour. During this exam, a radio-opaque dye will be injected into a vein in your arm. (This dye contains iodine.) You will feel warm after this injection and you may have a bitter taste in you mouth. These are normal feelings. You will have a series of films taken after the injection. You will remain in the x-ray room until the radiologist checks all of the films taken.

Liver/Spleen Image (Nuclear Medicine): This test will allow the doctor to detect any disease in you liver or spleen. You will be given an injection into the vein of your arm and asked to lie on a table. It is important that you lie still. A large camera passes over your body and takes images. The imaging process will take 1 1/2 to 2 hours.
Loopogram: During this exam, you will receive an injection of a contrast agent (x-ray dye). The exam will take about 1 hour. The radiologist will take several films while you are lying on the x-ray table. You will remain in the x-ray room until the radiologist checks all of the films taken.

Mammogram: A mammogram is a special x-ray of your breasts. Several x-rays of both breasts are taken while you are standing and/or seated. The test takes about 30 minutes and the radiation dose is very small. Pressure is applied to the breast to improve detail and reduce the amount of radiation needed. This pressure may be uncomfortable, but is very brief. If you have breast tenderness before your period, schedule the mammogram test just after your period. A short breast physical exam is then done by the x-ray technologist.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a way to look inside the body using a magnetic field combined with radio waves. This combination provides your physician with a detailed look at the anatomical structures within you body. The exam will last approximately 30 to 60 minutes. You will be asked to lie as still as possible for the length of the exam. The MRI scan is completely painless. You will hear different sounds during the scan, usually much like that of a drum beat. Certain exams require a small injection of contrast which helps the doctor when interpreting the scan. This is based on the type of study performed.

Myelogram: A Myelogram is an x-ray exam that allows the doctor to look at and learn more about your spine. Your myelogram will be performed in the UNITED X-Ray department by a radiologist. During the myelogram, a dye is placed into your spinal canal. This dye outlines the nerves and spinal cord. X-rays are then taken.

Nephrostogram: During this exam, you will receive an injection of a contrast agent (x-ray dye). The exam will take about 1 hour. The radiologist will take several films while you are lying on the x-ray table. You will remain in the x-ray room until the radiologist checks all of the films taken.

Oral Cholecystogram: This test evaluates your gallbladder and detects gall stones. During the exam, x-rays will be taken while you are standing, and in lying positions. You will remain in the x-ray room until the radiologist checks all of the films taken.

Sinogram: During this exam, you will receive an injection of a contrast agent (x-ray dye). The exam will take about 1 hour. The radiologist will take several films while you are lying on the x-ray table. You will remain in the x-ray room until the radiologist checks all of the films taken.

Stereotactic Biopsy: Stereotactic core biopsy is a computer assisted needle biopsy which is used for extracting samples of masses or calcifications which can be seen on mammography but not felt on breast examination. You will be lying on your stomach on a special x-ray table designed for this procedure. Your breast hangs down through a circular cut-out near the head of the table. The breast needs to be compressed tightly for the procedure to be accurate. The breast is numbed in the area of the biopsy with xylocaine, a local anesthetic. A needle is inserted into the breast. Secial mammographic pictures are taken before and after the biopsy to confirm that the needle passed through the lesion. Most patients experience only mild discomfort during the biopsy procedure. If you have any allergies to local anesthetic medicines, please inform us. You can expect the procedure to last about one hour.

T-Tube Cholangiogram: During this exam, which will take about 1 hour, the radiologist will inject a contrast (x-ray dye) into your t-tube. This contrast helps to visualize the bile ducts. The radiologists will then take several films. You will remain in the x-ray room until the radiologist checks all the films taken.

Ultrasound: The Ultrasound examination will assist the doctor in evaluating your condition. An ultrasound is a test which utilizes a high frequency sound wave similar to sonar. There is no radiation involved and the examination is painless. The test can take anywhere from 45 to 60 minutes. During you examination, you will lie on an ultrasound table. Ultrasonic jelly, which helps to transmit sound waves, is then applied to the body area to be examined. A small ultrasound probe is passed over the area to be examined while images are printed on hard copy to be kept in your permanent file.

Upper G.I. or Small Bowel: The Upper G.I. will allow the doctor to check the function of your stomach. The exam will take about 1 hour. During the exam, you will be given a white thick liquid (barium) and possibly some gas releasing crystals to drink. The radiologist will take several films with you in different positions. You will remain in the x-ray room until the radiologist checks all of the films. If a small bowel x-ray is ordered, you will stay in the x-ray department until the barium has passed from your stomach through the small bowel and into the large bowel. This can take up to 3 hours. More x-rays are taken periodically during this time.

Venogram: A Venogram is special test that studies the veins in your body, usually the legs, for blood clots. The test takes about 1 hour. The radiologist will place a small needle into a vein on the top area of your foot. A tourniquet is placed around your ankle and a contrast (dye-like substance) is injected. This injection may cause a brief sensation of warmth or cause a bitter taste in your mouth. These are normal feelings. The contrast is carried along with the blood flow and can visualize, on x-ray, the blood vessels or veins in that part of you body. A series of x-rays will be taken before the needle is removed.

 
  MCCH

Murray-Calloway County Hospital
803 Poplar Street
Murray, KY  42071
(270) 762-1100

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